Skip to main content

Review: The Breakdown by B.A. Paris

If you can’t trust yourself, who can you trust?

Cass is having a hard time since the night she saw the car in the woods, on the winding rural road, in the middle of a downpour, with the woman sitting inside―the woman who was killed. She’s been trying to put the crime out of her mind; what could she have done, really? It’s a dangerous road to be on in the middle of a storm. Her husband would be furious if he knew she’d broken her promise not to take that shortcut home. And she probably would only have been hurt herself if she’d stopped.

But since then, she’s been forgetting every little thing: where she left the car, if she took her pills, the alarm code, why she ordered a pram when she doesn’t have a baby.

The only thing she can’t forget is that woman, the woman she might have saved, and the terrible nagging guilt.

Or the silent calls she’s receiving, or the feeling that someone’s watching her…

Amazon   /   B&N   /   iBooks   /   Kobo

**** 4 Stars ****

I am sitting here at my computer, searching for what to say about this book. I am not sure what I expected, but I can tell you that I got more than I bargained for. B.A. Paris is definitely moving up my must-read-authors list! Two books in and both are winners!

Taking a journey in the main character, Cass's mind was a mind fuck in itself. Her slow mental decline and paranoia are contagious. The writing of this story is superb!

Let me be honest, I had my suspicions throughout the book. They all kept going back to the same place. By the time I got to the end, I knew I had been correct. However, that didn't change my shock and fist bumps as I read those last few chapters. My pom poms were waving and shaking for Cass's victory!

This is a story that I don't even want to talk about the characters. I think everyone needs to go into this book with only the blurb. I will say there was one thing that needed changed about this book that would have made it better... Buuut, I can't tell you what that is because that would be spoiling a very important aspect of the book. Let me just say that this aspect was focused on a little too much and too long for my liking.

Comments