Review: Darktown by Thomas Mullen

Responding from pressure on high, the Atlanta police department is forced to hire its first black officers in 1948. The newly minted policemen are met with deep hostility by their white peers and their authority is limited: They can’t arrest white suspects; they can’t drive a squad car; they can’t even use the police headquarters and must instead operate out of the basement of a gym.

When a black woman who was last seen in a car driven by a white man turns up fatally beaten, no one seems to care except for Boggs and Smith, two black cops from vastly different backgrounds. Pressured from all sides, they will risk their jobs, the trust the community has put in them, and even their own safety to investigate her death. Their efforts bring them up against an old-school cop, Dunlow, who has long run the neighborhood like his own, and Dunlow’s young partner, Rakestraw, a young progressive who may or may not be willing to make allies across color lines.
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**** 4 Star Review ****

I don't even know where to start with this book. It is equally parts a mystery and a history lesson. I was a little overwhelmed with this book. Knowing that the incidents in this story are very factual based on the time period, it was very hard to swallow at times.

I am not going to go into big detail about the plot and subplots in this story. Just know that everything in this book is connected with a result of the big picture at the end. 

I loved getting to know the characters in this book. The relationships between white cops and the black cops is a big part of this story. The trust and mistrust between them is more than realistic than I could have imagined. 

I thoroughly enjoyed this book. The only drawback of this book is the tidbits of unnecessary information that drew the story out but had no insight to add to the story. Aside from that, this book was a good read.

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